Coffee

Ovenbird Artisan Coffee Roasters – Fly, Ovenbird, fly!

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“The Ovenbird is a migratory songbird that takes refuge in heavily shaded coffee farms. Coffee from rustic or traditional polyculture farms provides the best quality habitat for birds. Population outbreaks of some insect species can have a devastating effect on the forest because the insects severely defoliate the trees or attack the bark. Vast areas of forest have been killed during outbreaks in the past. Birds are technologically advanced, highly motivated, extremely efficient, and cost-effective, insect-pest controllers.

Ovenbird Coffee is a nature-friendly business based in local community Scotland.”

About Ovenbird

Fly, little Ovenbird, fly!

 


Before we start

Once upon a time, a Twitter conversation took place:

And thus begun the story of how we got to taste a variety of beans from Ovenbird Artisan Coffee Roasters!

I loved Ovenbird Coffee before I even got to try it. The label, the roasting notes, the logo, the overall design – It all felt really appealing, witty and inviting for a coffee lover. Davide from Ovenbird Artisan Coffee Roasters was overly kind and sent us four bags of different varieties to taste and review – Thank you Davide! Hope you will enjoy our review as much as we enjoyed your coffee. Most of these coffees were brewed as espresso, some in the Aeropress and some in the Clever Dripper. All the coffees we tried were all around great in quality.

Nineteen Eighty-Four Blend

We started off with the only blend of the four coffees we tried – The nineteen eighty-four. The blend is roasted fairly dark, and we weren’t sure if we were going to like it, but we were wrong! The blend kept growing on us and at the end I was a bit sad that it was all gone (and so soon). This blend with its multiple levels of flavor experiences was really interesting and definitely a great blend of the Guatemalan and Ethiopian coffees. If you are not a friend of dark blends it might not be for you, but we ended up liking this quite a bit!

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Colombia Medellin Supremo

Big beans with big taste! These red bourbon beans were a medium acidity brew in the espresso, and a great kick-start to a busy morning. Tad nutty (like me before my espresso in the mornings), not as acidic as I expected, medium body and a good all-rounder in the cup. A great single origin coffee.

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Guatemala Conception Huista

I love any coffee that has even a hint of vanilla, and this Guatemalan yellow bourbon variety has it all: Big body, melon and vanilla, date pudding, figs, melted choc mouthfeel. Oh yeah, definitely a great one in your espresso or Aeropress. Like pure sunshine in a cup, or “smooth, lingering finish, like a fine Scotch”, as Ovenbird themselves described this coffee.

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Kenya Kamwangi Peaberry Nyeri

“Oh my.. What.. This.. Oh my dear.. Can you taste what I’m tasting?! Just.. Wow!”

Best for the last? This (above) is how we felt about the Ovenbird Kenyan coffee in our espresso when we first brewed it on a cold Saturday morning . An explosion of beautiful body and flavor, this Kenyan peaberry delivers the biggest punch from this bunch! Double fermented and fully washed, the tones in this cup were just amazing. Rhubarb and papaya, hints of tobacco and raisin with brown sugar sweetness. A favourite of ours with a long shot – Like a chewy whisky.

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You can find these coffees and more from the Ovenbird shop! I recommend giving their taster pack a go – You might just become one of the birds.

2 thoughts on “Ovenbird Artisan Coffee Roasters – Fly, Ovenbird, fly!

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